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security and foreign policy issues as opposed to his very robust domestic agenda? jon: lindsey graham was on with his last hour and pretty critical about the job the department of homeland security -- which, after all, is an arm of the administration -- did in the tsarnaev case. want to play a clip. >> my problem with this administration is their policies are failing. they do not believe that we're at war. they ignored signs and warnings from libya. we haven't had one person detained as an enemy combatant for intelligence-gathering purposes since he's been president. jon: is this starting to resonate with voters, do you think? >> i don't know yet that we've seen that. but we could see it over time. i think it pretty much depends on how the public views the president's handling of these incidents, and do they think that the president is keeping them safe. as we saw under president bush, you can have a horrific attack on the home lambed, and if you respond -- homeland, and if you respond in a way the public feels you should respond, they like your response, they're going to feel good ab
a lot to make america safer, but we are not yet safe. and clearly, because of our foreign policy, because of the freedoms we enjoy, there are individuals here in this country and certainly around the world who do not like america. they want to bring harm to america. and it's for that reason that we do have all of the laws we have put in place following 9/11 to ensure that we make america safe as possible, consistent with the protections provided under the constitution. >> okay. but do you think new york police commissioner chief ray kelly, who is probably one of the greatest in the history of the city, all right, really. they, of course, have a whole anti-terrorism, counterterrorism unit. they also, general gonzalez, they also monitor the muslim community. that is not to say that all muslims are radical jihadists, but they do monitor the muslim community. they take a lot of flack for it from liberals and left and certain media people. but that's what they do. when you look at this story, sir, in a sense, i hate to say this, but it's all the same. all these things. young, radical
issues in difficult american foreign policy. when do we get involved in an atrocity going on within someone else's country. that's a very tough question. would we have intervened in germany in 1938 if we knew what was going on. i think we all like to say we we d have and if we could, would have stopped it. it presupposes and the implication is we have a right do that anywhere in the world if there's an atrocity going on. that a u reflect on little bit? >> thank you, senator. defined one t significant kpant issue -- of militaryal basis intervention in the country. certainly every nation has a themselves in t their own history of self-defense. but to answer your question, you of the dimensions of his that you laid out, as did amplify on psey who cuts back ations and on the quell, when do we do this. what basis? we canthere a frame work follow? y answer is you start with the realities. these are both imperfect different situations. out, i dempsey laid think, rather clearly some of he dimensions of each of the countries in that region. self-interest. you have others who have self-inter
encounter with tamerlan in a pizza shop three months ago. the older brother argued with foreign policy, the wars in afghanistan and iraq and religion. tamerlan referred to the bible as a cheap copy of the koran and maybe of his countries are wars are based upon the bible. he had nothing against the american people. he had something against the american government. yeah. and dzhokhar became naturalized last september. federal officials told the ap his older brother had a green card but may have been thwarted by an assault charge. >> some ex-girlfriend. >> stephanie: right. you know, we'll find out more from the fbi because apparently russia had asked them to investigate him at one point but they came up with nothing and at that particular point. the mayor of boston. >> thank you, thank you, thank you. thank you to the law enforcement officials for working together. state police, boston police, fbi, all working together. that's when government works the best. i want to thank also the citizens out there. the last week, i know what's happening because of the bombing at the marathon. but to
they are there and most definitely doesn't mean we ought to make foreign policy based on their nightmares. [ applause ] >> stephanie: thank you, michael tomasky, great stuff. governor deval patrick. >> we have a million questions, and those questions need to be answered. >> stephanie: yeah hello, just wait for a second before you get the vapors again, lindsey graham. when preachers said it was appropriate for muslims to celebrate u.s. holidays tamry listen -- that was one of the outbursts he had. two u.s. officials said monday the brothers were motivated byry -- by religion, but don't appear to be tied to any groups. tamerlin called the preacher a non-believer and a hypocrite, they shouted back at him telling him to leave, and he did. so it was like a deaf muslim jam. and this is the doctor at boston medical center. >> nearly all of the patients that have lost legs are already walking the halls with physical therapists. it talks a lot of work safety practice, and they have to learn new routines but we're all gearing up for a mass exodus to rehab. >> stephanie: yeah, just because th
think for the foreign exchange market, it's more a question of policy action. and now, because we're in this limbo, that leaves sterling a little bit of limbo. >> meanwhile, the treasury there is targeting sales of 4 to 5 billion sales in six-month and is 1-month t bills. yes, same with italian yields, as well, michael. are we now at the low point in the cycle for spanish and italian yields? who is going to drive them lower from here and why would you? >> i think the market has seen a lot of liquidity expansion. first from the fed and then lastly from the bank of japan. and combined with the renewed commitment from the ecb to protect the euro, this has depressed yields to these kind of levels. i think it's difficult to see us going dramatically further. and if anything, strategically, we think that the three major problems in europe, the recession, inconsistent crisis management and rising political and social backlash against austerity are likely to come through and that leaves spain and italy very vulnerable to a sharp increase in yields. we're looking, for example, for 10-year
on foreign relations, previously was a project director for the 2009 independent task force on u.s. immigration policy and previously worked at the financial times with the washington bureau chief there. from norths us now branford, connecticut on our independent line. caller: good morning. i am in disagreement with your guest. he says there is no problem on immigration. watched c-span and heard the calls come in about immigration yucca guest: -- host: they are against immigration? let's let him give his take on the immigration issue. talkinge have been about the boston issue. that is a screening history. there is a broader issue of immigration reform in washington. we have an 840 four page bill drawn up by the so-called gang of eight. hearing in the senate judiciary committee today. this is a big bill and raises issues far beyond the boston bombings. if you actually look at public opinion polls, most americans either say we have enough immigration now, or somewhat too much. it is a small minority of americans calling for more immigration. generally, americans are happy with the
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7